Paris/COVID: What now my love?

IMG_1233

Take out survival strategies at local restaurants

Recently, this meme popped up on my FB feed:

“At this point I’m about 97.5% feral and won’t be able to be integrated back into society.”

Yep! Covidophobia or Covidophilia?

Many people I talk to are either refusing to deconfine or dreading the prospect. I admit, I have to force myself to go out even on a beautiful day and I hyperventilate when swarms start forming or people get too close, probably not a great idea right now even with a mask…

I’ve never been a crowd person. Arriving in Paris from US suburbs, with limited big city smarts, I avoided large groups from the get-go, especially on public transportation. Until the day a respectable-looking businessman wagged his limp member at me through his open trench coat when I was sitting at the deserted end of a Metro car, where no one else could see what he was doing. This was horrifying in itself but even worse because his organ resembled a bald, dead turkey neck and I was too young and scared to know what to do. Ever after I chose to surround myself with other humans whenever possible, betting on safety in numbers. I bit the bullet going to work at rush hour, squished between shoulder bags and backpacks. I baked in 2-hour lines 5 deep at Disneyland Paris without complaining  just to see the thrill on my kids’ faces once we got on the ride. Tried out the huge stadiums for concerts, but prefer more intimate venues. Jostled and prodded through countless grocery store check-out single files, I developed ingenious personal space strategies. You see, France is not traditionally a place with the same queuing etiquette as the US, not to mention hygiene (with excesses on both sides I grant you). So for me, social distancing is literally a breath of fresh air. Thank you COVID. Thus far I don’t miss mass transit, but I do miss air travel. How else will I return to the States to see my loved ones there? No way I’m getting on a boat.

Other things I don’t miss: the factory atmosphere of industrialized education, with kids in quadrants of 20-30 (and more), formatted by age, herded along as if on conveyor belts with productivity  quotas and evaluations administered by too few overwhelmed adults, and little one-to-one attention. As long as we’re starting over, how about getting rid of factory farms?

Things I’m glad to “get back” to: recycling and composting, street cleaning. Things I can’t wait to experience again: cafés and restaurants, museums, open parks and swimming facilities (but what will they be like?). For info, the Mayor of Paris is installing the fresh water swimming area on our canal (will it be mobbed?)

Will I miss the cheek-brushing French air smooch it took me so long to get used to? Will it come back?

Confinement has been a crucible for relationships, making them or breaking them.  Are some of us turning into plants?

Maybe not such a bad thing? Whatever the case may be, this video is gorgeous:

Can we learn symbiosis?

Forward into uncertainty!

xxxxxx Aliss

 

Paris Unlocked?

May 2017

(A May evening before the pandemic)

One week since deconfinement started. At first the prospect seemed like light at the end of the tunnel, but the closer it came, the more I wondered.

Where we are: Paris is in a “red zone” where the virus is still very active. Middle schools and high schools are closed, non-essential group gatherings are discouraged, remote working encouraged. Restaurants, cafés, movie theaters and parks still off limits, all cultural events cancelled… But, we are allowed outside without a “permission slip” as many times a day as we wish, can move around freely if we stay within a 100 kilometer radius of our home. Public transportation is running at 75% capacity,  masks mandatory, social distancing requested. 

Pollution is down due to fewer commuters. We can still see the stars. Our street has filled up with parked cars and some drivers, not everyone is wearing masks or keeping their distance in stores and on the sidewalk. Hordes of people have returned to the banks of the canal.  75% of those polled believe we will be reconfined.

So, yes, more freedom of movement, but greater risk of contamination outside, continuing uncertainty, and negotiations with our teen, whose peers seem to think that closed high schools are an invitation to zip around Paris and party.

Our family is staying semi-confined until Paris is a “green zone” with less risk. Working from home, home schooling, not socializing, only going outside when absolutely necessary and then with masks. 

Some confinement highlights…

I loved my rhythm: Working in the morning, working out every afternoon, first time in years! Highly recommend Dance Cross Fit with Becky, Cardio Sculpt with Judy, Dance it Out with Stephannie and more:

http://ymcaulster.org/virtual-class-schedule/

http://www.unisonarts.org/dxf

-Teaching myself how to work Final Cut Pro software. Two new videos up on Youtube about visualization:

https://thankyouparis.wordpress.com/2020/04/18/paris-lockdown-turn-on-your-inner-tv/

How to use our imagination as a time machine to build the future. For more inspiration see this article about Astronaut Scott Kelly’s year in outer space:

 

Newest Final Cut project, a video for my most-streamed song, “Brooklyn” (cover image only on YouTube for the moment)

 

This required sorting through hundreds of family photos, with I never would have done without confinement..

To be continued…

Aliss

Paris Lockdown: Fallow Time/Dreamtime

Australian Artist Regina Karadada/Wandjinas

Screenshot 2020-04-30 at 13.28.36

Day 47-ish?

Confinement sleep roller coaster? Out like a light, then bizarre vivid dreams? You’re not the only one.

My latest crazy crop:

(Any ressemblance to persons living or dead is purely coincidental)

-Bought a penthouse with a swimming pool, fitness room, luxurious dining room with chandeliers.  Excited until I looked up at the sliding roofing and saw rusted iron fittings that needed a lot of (expensive) work.

-Having an affair with a friend’s husband (not!) stole all her jewellery (not!).

-In a new apartment with a window garden. Picked up a plant that was part cactus and part caterpillar, very alive and affectionate. It showed me where it wanted to be, a larger planter, more earth more space.

-Moving and all my possessions in a large red trunk that had to be transported up a steep hill. Husband drove off in a van without me, leaving me only a rickety bike.

-Hired to play the lead in a musical, but had only 24 hours to learn all songs and text before run through with producers.

-Went to China, staying in a Chinese hotel and eating local food. Noticed some bumps in my nose. Doctor examined me and said it was some kind of larvae. He showed me horrifying pictures of how it would develop: living creatures with fat bodies and appendages of all colours. No known cure. All of a sudden he put his mouth over my face and breathed antibodies into my lungs. Blew my nose and it was full of green stuff. I was all better.

Just writing this down is exhausting and disorienting.

Sometimes I feel like those poor chronobiology guinea pigs living in caves for months in the name of science. Deprived of sunlight, their circadian rhythms slide into oblivion.

Trying to stay on track with work, homeschooling, volunteering, communicating with distant family, but fewer deadlines, fewer interruptions, reprieve from transportation hassles and disrupted sleep put me in a fallow state, like the city parks that used to be packed with people, now returned to their own natural cycles. Between jolts of stress about the future, deeper resources are resetting and replenishing inside me. My mind and body are quieter, like the city streets with no traffic, where you can suddenly hear birdsong and human voices.

IMG_1168

(Buttes Chaumont, freed from people, April 2020)

Beyond my current dream circus, there are other dimensions of dreaming. The word Dreamtime echoes in my thoughts.

“The Dreamtime is a commonly used term for describing important features of Aboriginal spiritual beliefs and existence. It is not generally well understood by non-indigenous people.

The Australian aborigines believed that the land they occupied was once not in existence like it is today. It was free from form or life, vacuous – empty.

….the land, mountains, hills, rivers, plants, lifeforms both animal and human and sky above were formed by the actions of mysterious and supernatural spirits.

During the Dreamtime the creators made men women and animals…gave them their totems and their Dreaming…declared the laws of the land and how people were to behave to one another, the customs of food supply and distribution, the rituals of initiation, the ceremonies of death which are required to be performed so that the spirit of the dead travels peacefully to his or her spirit-place, and the laws of marriage….

Aboriginal people understood the Dreamtime as a beginning that never ended. They held the belief that the Dreamtime is a period on a continuum of past, present and future.”

More information and an energizing dip into in the realm of these people and their art:

https://www.aboriginal-art-australia.com/aboriginal-art-library/aboriginal-dreamtime/

What if confinement fallow moments are our Dreamtime?

Can we be the ancestors dreaming a better future into being?

 

Climate activist and social change visionary David Gershon believes humanity can use this unique moment in history as a chrysalis to create Peace On Earth in 2030:

Screenshot 2020-04-30 at 13.42.01

http://peace2030.earth

 

Entrepreneurial Soul Coach Rha Goddess calls the pandemic a Sacred Pause. Check out her FB live with best selling author and Green Pioneer Queen Afua about healing ourselves and the world:

Can we be Cathedral Thinkers?

DSC03538

(Rose window, Notre Dame de Paris)

“The concept of Cathedral Thinking stretches back through the centuries to medieval times, when architects, stonemasons and artisans laid plans and began construction of the soaring, cavernous structures that served as places of worship, community gathering spaces and safe havens.

Since then, the concept has been applied to space exploration, city planning and other long-term goals that require decades of foresight and planning so future generations can enjoy their full realization.”

Listen to Ian Sansom interview Dr. Simon Beard as he “meets the people daring to dream beyond their own lifespans and wonders how he might go about doing so himself. As he explores contemporary cathedral projects with the potential to shape the future of science, technology and environmental protection, Ian asks what we can learn from the original medieval cathedral thinkers and if cathedral projects are all voyages of discovery into uncharted territory.”

https://www.cser.ac.uk/news/radio-4-cathedral-thinkers/

Let there be dreaming…

xxxxx Aliss